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Posts from the ‘Film’ Category

The Makers of Things

June 25, 2013

theenglishholidayclub

 

I’ve just released the short film collection I’ve been working on for the past year, The Makers of Things.

It’s a series of four films documenting the work and workshops of the Society for Model and Experimental Engineers (SMEE) whom I first met in January 2012. I’ve been following them around with a camera since and thanks to support from Ideastap, I was able to turn a hobby project into something more substantial.

You can watch the full set at: http://themakersofthings.co.uk/

I hope you like them.

The Makers of Things preview

June 8, 2013

theenglishholidayclub

New project to be released very soon!

Don’t Over Manage the Scene

December 6, 2012

theenglishholidayclub

Comics and films aren’t so different, you know.

I’ve been interested in what each can learn from the other for some time now, having bounced back and forth between the two in some capacity for a while. As a writer I’ve always been intrigued by different methods of production for both comics and films, but as a maker and producer of films I’ve learnt that strong scripts will only get you so far. In documentaries particularly, other things come into play.

I was asked to talk about this topic at the inaugural 1000 words event, as part of this year’s Thought Bubble Festival a few weeks back.

Screen Shot 2012-12-06 at 12.23.26

So, if you’re interested in hearing what I had to say, there’s a video of the talk on the Thought Bubble Festival blog, and a piece on Forbidden Planet too.

There’s lots of other directions I’d like to take this talk in – the way that people perceive documentaries as continually evolving, “fuzzy” experiences and how that maps onto some of the ways we absorb imagery on a daily basis, like Instagram. Truth and integrity are also really important here, Robert Flaherty (one of the pioneers of documentary film) is well known for over sensationalising moments and characters in his films, encouraging them to be more like he thought they should be/were, rather than who they genuinely are. How does that map onto a creators vision for a comic, does it make them over manage a scene, or pursue a vision that jars with the characters and the story they’re creating?

Anyhow, that’s a bit of a brain dump. Not sure if/when I’ll get an opportunity to expand on this but, in the meantime, I’d be fascinated to hear from anyone else with a finger both the comics and film domains to see how this maps onto your experiences. Drop me a line.

 

The act of labour

August 31, 2012

theenglishholidayclub

We had some visitors in the office from Oslo the other day.

“Anyone can shoot a good looking film these days. But you need a good story to make it a good film, and you could have shot that using your iPhone.”

SO TRUE.

Work is being done here

August 16, 2012

theenglishholidayclub

A couple of months back I filmed James Bridle’s Working Shop. An art installation come coding workshop aiming to display the craft of code as an industrial artisan might.

The detritus of code is obviously much less visually striking than that of furniture production say, so documenting the craft through film was an interesting challenge. It’s almost the same problem that James faced – walking into his space who would know he was coding because what strikes you is the vacancy of the space, not the whirr of machines or the sawdust on the floor.

See for yourself what it’s all about.

Caine’s Arcade

May 6, 2012

theenglishholidayclub

I meant to publish this a few weeks back – apologies.

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A week or so ago, I gave money to a child I’d never met. I donated to Caine’s Scholarship Fund.

That’s kind of crazy. I sent cash to a kid on the other side of the world to help enable him to go to University. And not because I felt guilty or was stirred by a charitable campaign, because I saw something he’d done and was pretty damn overwhelmed by it. I saw it in a film.

I spend a lot of time at work espousing the advantages of film; bringing ideas alive, real people, real voices etc. But sometimes you see work that just smashes those sentiments right out of the park. Don’t just say, do.

To date, 3.2M people have watched that film and almost £200,000 has been donated to Caine and his future. That’s the kind of future I want to live in.